GSI Analysis: NJ’s Workforce and Revenue Results Are Better Indicators of the State of Our Economy

GSI Analysis: NJ’s Workforce and Revenue Results Are Better Indicators of the State of Our Economy

“While a declining unemployment rate is good news, our workforce remaining below 2008 levels is one sign there’s more than meets the eye when it comes to New Jersey’s economy,” said GSI’s president Regina M. Egea. “Our weak GDP rate shows an economy that’s stagnant while others are booming and we have looming questions regarding our revenue sources in the event of an economic slowdown.”

APP.com: NJ not getting money's worth on gas tax

APP.com: NJ not getting money's worth on gas tax

GSI’s president Regina M. Egea authored an op-ed which appeared on APP.com and in the Asbury Park Press on our recent report on achieving $2 billion in savings on the cost of New Jersey’s roads and bridges:

“Our government is spending more money than every other state in the U.S. “because we’re New Jersey” and refuses to hold themselves accountable for our continuing poor road and bridge conditions?”

NJ.com: There’s a cheaper way to fix roads in N.J. We’re just doing it wrong, study says.

NJ.com: There’s a cheaper way to fix roads in N.J. We’re just doing it wrong, study says.

In a report on NJ.com and the Star-Ledger, veteran transportation reporter Larry Higgs takes a deep-dive on GSI’s latest research report Adding It All Up: The Path to Saving $2 Billion on the Cost of New Jersey's Roads and Bridges:

“Road construction here costs a painful $238,000 per mile, the highest of seven northeast states analyzed by experts for Garden State Initiative, a non-profit research and educational organization.”

ROI-NJ: Getting the most from N.J. infrastructure investments

ROI-NJ: Getting the most from N.J. infrastructure investments

In an op-ed on ROI-NJ.com, GSI’s president Regina M. Egea, discusses our latest research report Adding It All Up: The Path to Saving $2 Billion on the Cost of New Jersey’s Roads and Bridges and the importance of accountability for our infrastructure spending:

“Spurring an entrenched bureaucracy to action is a yeoman’s task. It is incumbent on all taxpayers, residents and business owners alike to demand action before another gas tax increase is on the table.”

GSI Research: Adding It All Up: The Path to Saving $2 Billion on the Cost of New Jersey's Roads and Bridges

GSI Research: Adding It All Up: The Path to Saving $2 Billion on the Cost of New Jersey's Roads and Bridges

Garden State Initiative today released Adding It All Up: The Path to Saving $2 Billion on the Cost of New Jersey's Roads and Bridges, which includes recommendations based upon a data-driven analysis of our investments in our state’s roads and bridges. Third in a series of reports on the true size of New Jersey’s expansive government, this report identifies $2 billion in savings that can be reinvested for tangible improvements to our state’s infrastructure.

NJ.com: Why should N.J. taxpayers pay 50 percent more for public workers’ benefits, pensions?

NJ.com: Why should N.J. taxpayers pay 50 percent more for public workers’ benefits, pensions?

GSI’s president Regina M. Egea authored an op-ed which appeared on NJ.com and in the Star-Ledger discussing the recent analysis produced by Dr. Charles Steindel that documented the stark difference between benefit costs for public and private sector employees in the US and NJ:

“This November, across New Jersey, thousands of candidates will be seeking state, county and local office. There are only 2 questions you need to ask of anyone seeking your vote: Do you think it’s right for me to pay 50 percent more than other states for your and other public employee benefits? And when will you insist on a vote to reduce the cost of these pension and benefits and pass those savings on to taxpayers?”

Analysis: The Stark Gap in Benefit Costs in Public and Private Sectors in NJ and US

Analysis: The Stark Gap in Benefit Costs in Public and Private Sectors in NJ and US

The Garden State Initiative today released The Stark Gap Between Public and Private Employee Benefits, an analysis of the latest employee compensation data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics which illustrates some dramatic differences in compensation costs between the public and private sectors. While it’s less surprising that government costs for retirement and medical benefits far exceed the private sector, the 50% differential in cost in New Jersey versus the rest of the US is startling.